Kodak Releases A Single Use Disposable Camera That Nobody Asked For

Instead of supplying all film vendors with much-needed film stock, Kodak took it upon themselves to create yet another one-time-use camera that increases our carbon footprint on the earth.

Introducing the newest Kodak feature: Professional Tri X 400 Single Use Disposable Camera. Yay.

In a time where recycling is paramount to keeping the planet in balance, the layers of plastic required to create these cameras are ridiculous and it’s even worse considering the fact that they can only be used once. It doesn’t really make sense to even have these devices in today’s world. Kodak Funsavers are really expensive at $21 dollars (they are even more costly at tourist locations). For a few dollars LESS you can grab a reloadable Lomography camera, and for a few dollars more you can grab another reloadable camera from Harman which includes two rolls of film!

What are they thinking? Perhaps they don’t haven’t created much film due to a supply shortage, and they are using their surplus of Tri X 400 to fill in these disposable cameras. But no one needed these Kodak. Y’all can keep these.

There is also a particular mystery surrounding the fact that Kodak had a recycling program that started in the 90s. We have TONS of disposable camera cases, empty film rolls, and canisters at Photodom that have been sitting here since we opened that could easily be put to use once again. However, there is currently no information regarding this incentive, and emails sent to Kodak’s Demand and Supply chain have gone unanswered as of today.

Here’s an excerpt taken from “1.5 Billion Single-Use Cameras and Counting

Eastman Kodak Company has achieved the milestone of recycling 1.5 billion single-use cameras, including both Kodak cameras and those from the company’s competitors.

Started in 1990, the Kodak single-use camera recycling program, works with photofinishing outlets to return used single-use cameras to Kodak sorting centers, where they are then routed for recycling. Nearly every piece of the camera is either recycled or reused in the ongoing production of more single-use cameras, bringing down costs for consumers and keeping huge amounts of waste out of landfills. Laid end-to-end, the 1.5 billion cameras would stretch 120,000 miles, which is enough to circle the earth five times or reach more than halfway to the moon.

Of the 1.5 billion, nearly 1 billion were Kodak single-use cameras. In the U.S., the rate of recycling rate for Kodak single-use cameras is 84%. That is up from 75% just a few years ago and is the highest rate of recycling of any consumer product in the U.S., handily beating the national recycling rates for items such as aluminum cans (52%) and consumer electronics (less than 20%).

With these increased recycling rates, it means that today most Kodak single-use cameras are produced from recycled camera bodies.

“We’re excited to remain a leading champion of recycling in the U.S. and beyond with this program that is now in its 19th year,” said Joel Proegler, general manager, Film Capture and vice president, Film, Photofinishing & Entertainment Group. “Even in this digital age, there continues to be strong demand for single-use cameras, and we’re continuing to meet this demand in an environmentally responsible manner.”

UPDATE: A recycle service by the name of Commodity Resource and Environmental Inc will accept any one time use disposable cameras and if you call 800-943-2811 they will send you 10 boxes with return labels via UPS mailing service. You can schedule a pickup or take them to an authorized UPS location. Here’s more information about them here.

So, in order to decrease our own participation in the wasteful production, one time use disposable camera will be defunct at Photodom in the new year of 2022. We will only carry reloadable disposables from that point on. Consider it part of our New Year’s resolution! Grab your Kodak funsavers and Harman cameras while you can!

Latest

INSTANT LOVE, Silver-halide Ecstasy, Boudoir on instant Film. 

In todays world of OnlyFans and digital dick pics,...

The Best of New York Fashion Week 2022

We know by now that not all of the...

Jamel Shabazz: Legendary Street Photographer

The 80s was a troubling time for New Yorkers....

Manic Exposure In The Cemetery And Other Spectral Deceptions

Jarred Oberman is an artist from New Jersey. He owns and operates an art space out of Hunterdon County.

Newsletter

spot_img

Don't miss

INSTANT LOVE, Silver-halide Ecstasy, Boudoir on instant Film. 

In todays world of OnlyFans and digital dick pics,...

The Best of New York Fashion Week 2022

We know by now that not all of the...

Jamel Shabazz: Legendary Street Photographer

The 80s was a troubling time for New Yorkers....

Manic Exposure In The Cemetery And Other Spectral Deceptions

Jarred Oberman is an artist from New Jersey. He owns and operates an art space out of Hunterdon County.

NYC Through the Eyes of My Grandpa

Last year I wrote a piece about navigating grief...
spot_imgspot_img

INSTANT LOVE, Silver-halide Ecstasy, Boudoir on instant Film. 

In todays world of OnlyFans and digital dick pics, I would like to draw attention to the art of the Polaroid boudoir. Boudoir is a...

The Best of New York Fashion Week 2022

We know by now that not all of the most trendsetting fashion shows occur right inside of Spring Studios for New York Fashion Week....

Jamel Shabazz: Legendary Street Photographer

The 80s was a troubling time for New Yorkers. There was gang violence, the rise of drugs such as crack cocaine and not to...

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here